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Wildcards are Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). of characters). like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful.and can be very powerful.and can be very powerful.and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).

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Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).

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Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).

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Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). featureWildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text.Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).Wildcards are like the blank pieces in Scrabble, or like the Jokers you can use in some card games to stand in for any card. You are perhaps already familiar with the “*” and “?” wildcards from file matching: In the File + Open dialog, you can display all files with the extension “.doc” by typing “*.doc”, or all files “01062001.doc”, “01072001.doc”, “01122001.doc”... by typing “01??2001.doc”. But the wildcard feature in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters). in Word goes way beyond that, and can be very powerful. To begin, you must first turn Wildcards on in the Find/Replace dialog. To do so, bring up the Find dialog, click More and check Use wildcards. In a macro, set .Find.MatchWildcards = True. If you do not do this, Word treats the wildcard characters as if they were ordinary text. As we'll see later, you can define ranges [], groups (), repeats @, {}, anchors < > and exceptions !. With these regular expressions you can search for patterns in your text that have certain things in common (some pattern: for example, that they only contain certain characters, or a certain number of characters).